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Student Investors Learn Valuable Life Lessons

Student Investors Learn Valuable Life Lessons

For more information, contact
Marsha Masters, Associate Director
501-682-4350
Marsha@economicsarkansas.org

May 18, 2016

For Release to Statewide Media
For Immediate Release

STUDENT INVESTORS LEARN VALUABLE LIFE LESSONS
Stock Market Game rewards investment savvy and conveys truths about life

LITTLE ROCK—More than 120 students in grades 4-12 were honored last week for earning positive investment returns in one of the most volatile stock markets of recent years, but they also learned that investment success requires persistence through many ups and downs—just like real life.

Economics Arkansas hosted a luncheon at Verizon Arena on May 10, 2016, to honor the first- and second-place winners of the Spring 2016 session of the Stock Market Game, an investment simulation program for students in grades 4-12. The junior investors received cash awards and trophies for growing a hypothetical stock portfolio of $100,000 over the course of 10 weeks. The highest-performing team—three junior high school students from Subiaco Academy in Subiaco, Logan County—increased their portfolio by more than 34 percent.

Jim Wooten of Beebe, a longtime board member of Economics Arkansas, welcomed the almost 250 guests at the luncheon and commended the winners for their perseverance. “The stock market . . . like life, it has an ebb and flow to it. You’ll have those days when everything goes great, you’ll have those days when things will have gone south,” he said and added: “Your commitment to this activity [the Stock Market Game] is to be commended. . . You know, commitment today, commitment is a dying art. It’s desired by many, but possessed by few. If you’re in an endeavor today, whatever it might be, you need to give it your best effort. You don’t need to be a quitter. You need to be one that stays the course through the duration of the time.”

Economics Arkansas, a nonprofit educational organization that trains educators how to integrate economics and personal finance concepts into the K-12 classroom curriculum, hosts the Stock Market Game program each fall and spring semester. It is a project-based investment simulation designed to teach saving and investing while also enhancing students’ math, business, communication, economics and analytical skills.

Almost 2,500 teams (approximately 7,380 students) participated in the Spring 2016 session. The combined registrations for both fall and spring sessions during the current school year total a record participation rate of 5,520 teams, almost 13,000 students. The numbers represent an increase of 28 percent compared to last year’s participation rate. On average, close to 10,000 students participate in the Stock Market Game program each year.

The winners of the Spring 2016 session are:

Elementary School Award
Region 1
First Place: Harp Elementary School, Lynn Massey, advisor; Springdale School District
Second Place: George Elementary School, Dianne Kellogg, advisor; Springdale School District
Region 2
First Place: Fordyce Elementary School, Tracie Canada, advisor; Fordyce School District
Second Place: Fordyce Elementary School, Tracie Canada, advisor; Fordyce School District
Region 3
First Place: College Hill Middle School, Irene Beck, advisor; Texarkana School District
Second Place: College Hill Middle School, Irene Beck, advisor; Texarkana School District
Region 4
First Place: Piggott Elementary School, Penny Toombs, advisor; Piggott School District
Second Place: Sulphur Rock Magnet School, Richie Kohl, advisor; Batesville School District
Region 5
First Place: Carl Stuart Middle School, Elizabeth Corey, advisor; Conway School District
Second Place: Warren Dupree Elementary School, Rick Kron, advisor; Pulaski County Special School District
Region 6
First Place: Taylor Elementary School, Marybeth Passmore, advisor; White Hall School District
Second Place: Hardin Elementary School, Marybeth Passmore, advisor; White Hall School District

Junior High School Award
Region 1
First Place: Lakeside Junior High School, Justin Brantley, advisor; Springdale School District
Second Place: Atkins High School, Craig Pinion, advisor; Atkins School District
Region 2
First Place: Subiaco Academy, Shirley Kiefer, advisor
Second Place: Poyen High School, Janet Wallace, advisor; Poyen School District
Region 3
First Place: South Arkansas Christian School, Bobby Beaird, advisor
Second Place: Magnolia Junior High School, Jonathan Gosdin, advisor; Magnolia School District
Region 4
First Place: Beebe High School, Mark Pinkerton, advisor; Beebe School District
Second Place: Beebe High School, Art Bell, advisor; Beebe School District
Region 5
First Place: Mabelvale Middle School, Graham Goodloe, advisor; Little Rock School District
Second Place: Benton Junior High School, Tamme Adams, advisor; Benton School District
Region 6
First Place: Watson Chapel Junior High School, Russell Johnson, advisor; Watson Chapel School District
Second Place: Watson Chapel Junior High School, Russell Johnson, advisor; Watson Chapel School District

High School Award
Region 1
First Place: Van Buren High School, Terri Burton, advisor; Van Buren School District
Second Place: Mountain Home High School , Johnny Caststeel, advisor; Mountain Home School District
Region 2
First Place: Hot Springs High School, Suzanne Skrivanos, advisor; Hot Springs School District
Second Place: Subiaco Academy, Shirley Kiefer, advisor;
Region 3
First Place: South Arkansas Christian School, Bobby Beaird, advisor
Second Place: South Arkansas Christian School, Bobby Beaird, advisor
Region 4
First Place: Paragould High School, Al Tiner, advisor; Paragould School District
Second Place: Pangburn High School, Janet Reaper, advisor; Pangburn School District
Region 5
First Place: North Little Rock High School, Michael Huels, advisor; North Little Rock School District
Second Place: North Little Rock High School, Michael Huels, advisor; North Little Rock School District
Region 6
First Place: White Hall High School, Tiffany Evans, advisor; White Hall School District
Second Place: White Hall High School, Tiffany Evans, advisor; White Hall School District

Also recognized were Lance Mabrey, Rector Elementary School, Rector School District, in the category of Teacher Division; Johnny Caststeel, Mountain Home High School Career Academics, Mountain Home School District, in the category of Portfolio Advisor; and Shirley Kiefer, Subiaco Academy, in the category of Apple Award.

The Stock Market Game is owned by the Securities Industry Financial Markets Association (SIFMA), and franchised to Economics Arkansas since 1999. In this investment simulation and competition, students trade “live” in the stock market. Teams of 1-5 students seek to grow a virtual $100,000 stock portfolio over the course of 10 weeks in the fall and in the spring. They compete in either the elementary (grades 4-6), junior high (grades 7-9) or senior high division (10-12) in one of the state’s six regions connected to a university economics center area. Teachers act as advisors who assist each team by inviting investment professionals to speak in the classroom, teaching their students how to research and become aware of current events that affect the market. The teams with the highest total equity at the end of each 10-week session in each division and region are recognized at the awards luncheon. The winners receive cash, medals and commemorative tee-shirts.

Support for the Stock Market Game program during the 2015-16 school year was provided by the Arkansas Securities Department; Bank of America Merrill Lynch; Caterpillar; Central Arkansas Planning & Development District; D&R Hobbs LLC; Donors Choose; Lou Graham, Morgan Stanley; Stephens Inc.; Riceland, and 3M Corporation.

Economics Arkansas (through the Arkansas Council on Economic Education) is a private, non-profit, non-partisan, educational organization founded in 1962 by Dr. Arch Ford and led by Dr. Bessie B. Moore to promote economic literacy in Arkansas. Its mission is to promote economic literacy and the economic-way of thinking to PreK-12 students in Arkansas by empowering educators to teach the fourth “r,” real life economics.

Real life economics teaches students:

  • To invest in their human capital, opening opportunities to the American Dream.
  • Decision-making skills and the costs associated with each decision.
  • Financial skills to better manage their resources in the future.
  • About the global market and their future roles as producers and consumers.

Note to media: Photos and names of members of most student teams are available upon request.

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